Current Moon Phase

Waning Gibbous
94% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Another Eclipse?

Another Eclipse?

Just two weeks after a total solar eclipse brushed the tip of Australia last week, those living down under are in for another treat. On Wednesday, November 28, a Penumbral Eclipse of the Moon will be visible there.

Central and eastern Asia, Australia and New Zealand are in the best position to see this eclipse.

A penumbral eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s penumbra, the the portion of the Earth’s shadow in which only a portion of the Sun’s light is obscured. This causes a subtle darkening of the Moon’s surface.

At maximum, 94 percent of the Moon’s diameter will be immersed in the Earth’s penumbral shadow during next week’s eclipse; the upper part of the Moon will appear noticeably shaded.

The times for the eclipse, according to U.S. Eastern Time, are as follows:
Moon Enters Penumbra: 7:12 a.m. • Maximum Eclipse: 9:33 a.m.
Moon Leaves Penumbra: 11:53 a.m. • Magnitude of the Eclipse: 0.942

1 comment

1 CARL W BALLASSO { 11.21.12 at 5:02 pm }

what are we seeing nov,20/21 2012, top of moon is black bottom half” sun shinning on.

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