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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Turn One Recipe Into Many Meals!

Turn One Recipe Into Many Meals!

Chicken Parmesan
Ingredients:
4-6 chicken breast cutlets (pounded to tenderize and to thin out)
1 cup seasoned breadcrumbs
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan or Romano cheese
Fresh chopped parsley
2 eggs
Salt & Pepper
1 1/4 cup olive oil–use only as much as you think you need for the amount of cutlets you are cooking at one time
Mozzarella cheese, sliced

Directions:
In a shallow bowl, mix together the breadcrumbs, cheese, and parsley. In a separate shallow bowl, whisk the eggs. Prepare a cooking tray with foil and spray with Pam.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit if this is all being done at one time. If preparing for later, preheat at that time.

Heat some of the olive oil in a large sauté pan on medium-high heat. The oil should be hot, but not smoking. Season the pounded cutlets with salt & pepper. Dredge the chicken cutlets 1 piece at a time, first in the egg mixture, then in the breadcrumbs–press to make sure the crumbs stick. Lay the pieces in the hot sauté pan. Turn the heat to medium and gently fry the cutlets until they are golden brown, about 3-4 minutes per side. Blot the cutlets with a paper towel when you turn them over and when they are transferred to the baking pan to remove excess oil. Place the amount of cutlets that you are having for one meal in the prepared tray. Put the other cutlets to the side for use in another meal with a salad.

Spoon some of the marinara sauce to cover each cutlet and place some slices of mozzarella over the sauce. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until the mozzarella begins to melt and get lightly brown. If you are making this ahead of time, put the cheese on the cutlets after they start to sizzle in the oven. If you are doing this all at one time, you can put the cheese on the cutlets as you are putting the freshly fried cutlets in the pan.

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1 comment

1 Arredondo { 09.04.13 at 11:52 am }

Great idea, and these recipes look easy and delicious.

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