Current Moon Phase

Waning Gibbous
81% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Got a Headache? Try this herbal relief.

Got a Headache? Try this herbal relief.

There’s nothing like a painful headache to stop summer fun in its tracks. Summer headaches can be caused by too much sun, hot and humid weather, dehydration or overtaxing the body. In these troubled financial times, people have been turning to herbal medicine to find answers for their physical and emotional woes.

One herb that has a reputation for helping headaches is feverfew. Feverfew is best used when you chew a fresh leaf or two straight from the plant. It can also be taken in a capsule format that contains freeze-dried feverfew. Many believe that the fresh leaves work better due to the bitter taste of the leaf that is left on your tongue.

The Chinese believe that headaches, especially headaches in the forehead region, are directly related to the liver. Bitter plants and foods may help diminish a headache by charging the liver. Over stimulation can defeat the purpose, however, so a little at a time is best for a simple headache reprieve. Consider nourishing the liver with dandelion, burdock, chamomile, mugwort, yarrow, and other bitter plants in small quantities over a period of days or weeks. This may lessen the frequency and duration of headaches and migraines.

When headaches are caused by dehydration, simply drink plenty of water, get hydrated and feel the relief!

Got a migraine?

Try making a migraine relief oil blend with essential oils of peppermint, lavender, rosemary, and eucalyptus. Apply the essential oil blend in a halo around the scalp – on the back of neck, behind the ears, temples and forehead where the hair ends. Leave for a while and it should help the pain go away.

*Note: If you are on medicines or have allergies, please consult with a doctor before trying these herbs. The information and tips suggested here are for general information and not as specific medical advice. Professional medical assistance should be sought with ongoing, chronic conditions. Please use at your own discretion, and when in doubt, consult your physician.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.