Farmers Almanac Weather

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The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Will Our Halloween Forecast Make You Scream?

Will Our Halloween Forecast Make You Scream?

With cold, and in some cases wet, weather predicted for much of the U.S. and Canada this Halloween, it won’t take ghosts or werewolves to send chills up the spines of trick-or-treaters. Read on below to see if Halloween will be a treat in your area:

United States
Northeast
Turning stormy over the Atlantic seaboard, with heavy rains and widespread flooding; some wet snow could mix in over the higher elevations of New England.

Great Lakes/Midwest
Stormy for the Ohio River and Great Lakes, where some wet snow could fall.

Southeast
Turning stormy.

North Central
Fair, turning colder in Rocky Mountains. Stormy for Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri.

South Central
Turning colder, with increasing clouds. Stormy for Arkansas and Louisiana.

Pacific Northwest
Fair, turning chillier.

Southwest
Fair, turning colder.

Canada
Newfoundland Labrador
Scattered showers, then fair.

Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec
Turning stormy over the Atlantic seaboard, with widespread flooding possible; some wet snow could mix in over the Laurentian Plateau.

Ontario
Stormy for the Great Lakes; some wet snow possible.

Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
Fair, turning colder from the Rocky Mountains. Farther east, storms develop.

British Columbia
Fair, turning chillier.

8 comments

1 Ali { 10.24.11 at 10:36 pm }

Yippee!, can’t wait for a spooktacular Halloween here in Alberta, hee hee!!!!
It’s always a chilly one, so get used to it…Boo hoo hoo!!!

2 joelle kelly { 10.24.11 at 10:30 am }

I live in Ontario , and i have been hearing from many people that they have seen alot of bee`s nest on the ground this year , does this mean a small amount of snow this year , and i have also counted the fogs , and there has not been that much to count as well , does anyone know if there is a differents between the bee`s nest or wasp nest would it be the same for the weather , ,,The wasp nest i have heard it was up hight also , and bee`s where down on the ground , please coment me i want to know what it means !!!

3 Robert DeBoard { 10.22.11 at 1:12 am }

I live in S.W. Ohio and only remember snow before halloween 2 times in my 52 years. Iwould love to see the snowy wet forcast the farmers are predicting. the kids can all go as eskimos.

4 K. Deardorff { 10.19.11 at 4:37 pm }

I can read all about the weather within the continental US, & Canada, in your Farmers’ Almanac, but nothing about Hawaii. Hawaii is a state, too. Why not include it, in the future?

5 Heather { 10.19.11 at 3:27 pm }

Nothing like the snow storm we had in minnesota when I was about 6 (20 years ago) I think every kids went as a snow suit that year. My brother drove me around town to get candy

6 Red { 10.19.11 at 2:49 pm }

Will you have snow in Alberta by Halloween. We usually have rain in western Oregon

7 Eric Emshey { 10.19.11 at 8:54 am }

It seems that we are in for a spooktacular Halloween, here in Southeastern Alberta.

8 Chris Andrews { 10.19.11 at 8:52 am }

Just like the Hallowen weather I remember as a kid In a Chicago suburb…cold and rainy. Here in IA, we have been spoiled for a few years now as far as I’m concerned and are do for more normal weather.

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