fbpx
Farmers Almanac
The Farmers Almanac
Order your copy today!

Baking Recipes for Quarantine!

Baking Recipes for Quarantine!

With many places still on lockdown, our everyday lives are a bit shaken up. Food is often a source of comfort, as well as nourishment for your whole family. After all, who couldn’t use a little comfort right about now?

Below are some of the best recipes to try during quarantine. They’re easy to throw together with items you’ve already got handy. If you’re looking for something new to cook up, give them a try!

Blueberry Muffins

Muffins are a great source of comfort, and recipes for blueberry muffins are popping up everywhere. Not only does life just seems a bit more manageable with freshly baked muffins in it but they’re a great way to utilize the frozen fruit from your freezer. This easy recipe is delicious and simple and the perfect way to start (or end) your quarantined day.

blueberry muffins on a table

Recipe from sweetcsdesigns.com

Ingredients:
½ cup softened butter
1 ¼ cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
½ tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
½ cup milk
2 cups fresh blueberries (or frozen, thawed)
3 teaspoons sugar for dusting tops

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400ºF and line a standard 12 cup muffin tin with paper cups.

Mix butter and 1 ¼ sugar until light and soft. Add eggs, beating after each one. Add vanilla, then sift the flour, salt, and baking powder, into the creamed mixture alternately with the milk.

Mash ½ cup of the blueberries with a fork, and mix into the batter, and fold in remaining whole berries.

Sprinkle the tops of the muffins with sugar. Reduce heat to 375, and bake at 375ºF for about 30-35 minutes. Remove muffins from tin and let cool for at least 30 minutes.

Tuna Pasta Bake

Pasta bakes are the golden goose for quick and easy family dishes. This classic comfort meal has only a few ingredients, most of which can be found right in your pantry (and freezer). This tuna pasta bake, packed with frozen veggies, is sure to be a family favorite.

Tuna and pasta casserole on a table covered in melted cheese

Recipe from kitchensanctuary.com
Ingredients
14 oz rigatoni pasta
3 tbsp butter
1 onion (peeled and chopped finely)
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 ½ cups milk
2 ¼ cups grated cheddar cheese
Salt and pepper
11 oz canned tuna or albacore (drained and flaked)
11 oz canned (or frozen) corn, drained
1 cup frozen peas
Handful of chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

Heat oven to 350ºF.

Boil pan of water and cook pasta according to package directions.

While pasta is cooking, melt the butter in a saucepan, add the onion and cook on low for 6-8 minutes or until the onions are soft.

Turn up heat to medium and stir in flour. Cook for 1-2 minutes.

Slowly add milk, stir with whisk until thickens. Add 2/3 of the cheese until melted. Season with salt and pepper.

Drain pasta and pour in to a baking dish. Pour over the white sauce, then add the turn, corn, peas and 1 tablespoon of the parsley. Mix together and sprinkle with the remaining cheese.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until the cheese is golden brown. Top with remaining parsley before serving.

Pea Soup (Made With Frozen Peas)

There’s a good chance you’ve got a bag of frozen peas in your freezer. Why not whip up some soup? This is recipe uses only four ingredients and is ready in about the same time as heating up a can of soup. Peas are versatile, nutritious, and full of fiber. Be sure to grab a few extra bags of peas to stock in your freezer the next time you’re at the grocery store. Or if you’ve got some from last year’s garden bounty that you blanched and froze, use those!

Recipe from veggiedesserts.com
Ingredients:
1 tbsp oil
1 onion chopped
3 cups vegetable stock
3 cups frozen peas

Instructions

Heat oil in large saucepan, add onion and cook on low heat for 5 minutes until soft.

Stir in stock, cover and cook for an additional 5 minutes

Stir in peas, bring back to a simmer and cook for 5 more minutes, or until the peas are cooked.

Puree the soup in a blender (or with an immersion blender).

Optional additions: top with fresh chopped mint or basil before serving. For a creamier variation, swirl in a dollop of plain Greek yogurt, or cream.

Slow Cooker Rice and Beans

Rice and beans continue to be a staple favorite. This pantry-based meal will be in regular rotation during quarantine. Best of all, your slow cooker does most of the work. Use it as a burrito filling or in a bowl topped with delicious fixings, like sour cream, cilantro, cheese, and lots of avocado. It’s packed with fiber, budget-friendly, and delicious!

Recipe from sweetandsavorymeals.com
Ingredients:
2 14-oz cans black beans (rinsed and drained)
1 cup of Arborio Rice
1 ¼ cups vegetable broth or water
1 cup chunky mild salsa
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon taco seasoning
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
¼ teaspoon chili powder (optional)
1 teaspoon lime zest

Directions:

Add rinsed and drained beans, rice, broth/water, salsa, and all your spices to the slow cooker.

Cover and cook on LOW for 3-5 hours.

Check after 3 hours, stir and if needed add ¼ cup of more water.

Before serving, stir in lime zest.

Tell us: what have you been cooking up lately? Leave your comments below.

Want More recipes?

Be sure to check out this easy Shortcut Banana Bread recipe that our Facebook fans went bananas over (a real time saver if you’re out of flour)!

Sign Up

Sign up for our Comfort Food Monday emails – you’ll receive a new recipe to try your inbox every Monday morning!

Shop for Related Products on Amazon

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Previous / Next Posts

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1919, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.

>
Reading Farmers' Almanac on Tablet with Doggie

Don't Miss A Thing!

Subscribe to Our Newsletter and Get a FREE Download!