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Does Eating an Apple A Day Really Keep The Doctor Away?

Does Eating an Apple A Day Really Keep The Doctor Away?

You’ve heard this popular saying but did you ever wonder if there’s any truth behind it? You be the judge!

Health Benefits of Apples

  • Apples are rich in iron and phosphorus, two minerals that are good for the brain, liver, and bowels.
  • One of the most beneficial parts of an apple is its acid content, both the malic and tartaric acids. These acids not only make the fruit itself digestible but also assist in the digestion of other foods. Apples help regulate the digestive system and can aid in the cure and prevention of constipation. They also help neutralize the effects of rich, fatty foods.
  • For constipation, try eating a ripe, juicy, preferably sour apple before bedtime every night.
  • When peeled and grated, the apple relieves flatulence and diarrhea.
  • The apple is also good for the teeth. The juice is cleansing, and the flesh is hard enough to help rid the teeth of plaque. There’s a reason they’re called “nature’s toothbrush”!
  • It is believed that unsweetened apple cider can be used as a preventative against gout and rheumatism.
  • Apples are thought to help prevent memory loss. Eating an apple a day, with one teaspoon of honey and one cup of milk, is recommended in the treatment for loss of memory and mental irritability.

Other Useful Apple Tips:

  • An apple in a sack of potatoes will prevent the potatoes from sprouting.
  • A half an apple placed in a container with brown sugar will help keep the sugar moist.
  • A slice of apple in the cookie jar or under a cake dome will help keep these baked goods moist.
  • To prevent apples from browning, try honey!

Disclosure: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1919, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.

Reading Farmers' Almanac on Tablet with Doggie

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