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Uh Oh, Snow? In May?

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Uh Oh, Snow? In May?

So far, spring 2017 has been quite cool and damp in many areas of the country but now it looks as though some even chillier weather is on its way. A major block is shaping up in the atmosphere during the next several days, and early next week it will be unusually cold in the Northeast US.

How cold?

Would you believe there is a possibility of snow on Monday into Tuesday for parts of Pennsylvania, New York, and New England?

omega_wx

Photo credit: NOAA.gov

The reason is due to something meteorologists refer to as an “Omega Block.”  The prevailing upper level winds in the atmosphere are bent into a shape resembling the Greek letter Omega Ω.

(Continued Below)

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Omega blocks are often quite persistent because of their size, and can lead to flooding and drought conditions depending upon one’s location under the pattern. Cooler temperatures and precipitation accompany the lows while warm and clear conditions prevail under the high.

There is a big ridge of warm, dry high pressure that will soon predominate over the Nation’s midsection, while troughs of low pressure, accompanied by cool, showery weather that will soon prevail along the coastlines.  Phoenix Arizona, which has seen temperatures soar into the 100s this week, will drop into the 70s next week!

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1 comment

1 lisa { 05.08.17 at 1:02 pm }

Wow. That is crazy. Here in Phoenix my thermometer read 67• degrees yesterday.

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