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Maintain Your Septic System Naturally!

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Maintain Your Septic System Naturally!

While this isn’t a pleasant topic for polite conversation, having your septic system back up into your home is anything but pleasant. There are steps that you can take, not only to prevent septic problems from happening, but to ensure that the process of breaking down flushed waste occurs as it should.

A more descriptive title for this article could be, “The Care and Maintenance Of The Gut in Your Yard.” If you understand the importance and benefits of eating dietary fiber, alkaline forming foods and taking probiotics for your own gut health, you’ll quickly see the similarity in maintaining a well-functioning septic system.

Like our own digestive systems, there are certain things that you should avoid putting into any septic system and certain things that are beneficial. There are proactive measures that you can take to keep things functioning well in the tank beneath your lawn. If you wait until there is a problem, you’ve waited too long, and should immediately call a septic cleaning company to pump your tank.

Indications that you may have a septic system problem are slow water drainage, and water backing up in the toilet, dishwasher, tub, or sinks.

(Continued Below)

Consider these septic system care and maintenance tips:

  • A family of 4 living in a home with a 1,000 gallon tank should have their septic system cleaned every 4 years. Ask your local septic cleaning company how often you should give them a call.
  • Do not use products containing bleach to clean your toilets, as it destroys the bacteria needed to break down waste solids in your septic system.
  • Yeast helps keep bacteria alive and actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of instant dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.
  • If you’re installing a new septic system or need to have yours pumped, it’s a good idea to know exactly where it’s located in your yard to avoid excessive digging up of your lawn during future pumping. Measure the exact distance of the septic tank lid from the house with a tape measure and take a picture with your cell phone, showing the exact measurement. Keep the photograph in a home maintenance file on your computer for future reference.

 

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49 comments

1 Dianna Urbigkit { 07.30.17 at 12:30 pm }

I have fermented cabbage that I need to dispose of…Can I dump it into toilet and flush! Will it hurt or help my septic. I have leech lines and do not use harsh chemicles. Thanks!

2 Susan Higgins { 07.25.17 at 8:35 am }

Thanks Claude, glad it worked!

3 claudefernandez7@yahoo.com { 07.24.17 at 7:26 pm }

We have been in our home 23 yrs. We have 2-500 gal and a 250 grease trap. We add 2 packets of yeast per tank a month. Never had a problem with them till this year. One tank got clogged because a tree root got in. Had a cleaning company clean out the tanks. Found only 2 inches of sludge in 2 tanks. The grease trap had non. I would say that plain old yeast does the trick.

4 judy { 06.05.17 at 12:06 pm }

Looking for bulk yeast try a Amish or mennonite community store.

5 Kate { 05.23.17 at 2:42 pm }

We use to buy our yeast in bulk at Sam’s Club. They no longer carry it.
Anyone know where yeast can be purchased?
Thank you for all this useful information!
It is gratefully appreciated.

6 Susan Higgins { 05.16.17 at 9:18 am }

Hi Dennis Williamson: It sounds like it’s doing OK but I’d check with a septic professional just to be safe.

7 dennis williamson { 05.14.17 at 9:52 pm }

I installed an all gravel leach field below my septic tank (1000 gallon)… covered it with plastic…then topsoil and planted grass. A year later, a contractor drove heavy equipment over it and got it stuck in the muck. I refilled it with topsoil and replanted grass. Did I do the right thing? The system has not backed up and no problems are obvious at this time.

8 Susan Higgins { 12.09.16 at 9:22 am }

Hi Cathy, that’s a new one to us. Did it work?

9 cathy { 12.08.16 at 9:43 pm }

My 92 year old mother says to cook a pot of pinto beans and flush every couple of month for a reliable septic treatment. Is this true or another fable ?

10 Mike { 10.15.16 at 4:42 am }

You can do what you want with your system but as new home owners with a septic system, we had the tank cleaned and inspected after 6 years. The results on our 1000 g tank was only 4″ of sludge and the filter needed cleaning (which I will now do annually). The inspector said the system looked real good and will probably see us again in 8 years for another pumping. This after using Rid X every 3 months and allowing vary little to no food products go down the drain.

11 Vic Laurent { 09.08.16 at 1:08 pm }

Regular pumping septic system is essential,small price to pay for peace of mind.NEVER allow coffee grinds to enter system an totally avoid any harsh chemicals.I have just my wife and I and pump the tank every 3 years.You have peace of mind especially in mid winter.Remember a Royal flush beats a full house…

12 derpppp { 09.01.16 at 1:40 am }

yeast is the active ingredient in ridX, smart guy

13 Cindy { 05.16.16 at 12:03 am }

I’m no expert,can only share my experience. Had our tank emptied after living in our home for 2yrs. That was 14yrs ago.I have faithfully used RidX monthly. No problems until we got a grease clog,a couple of weeks ago,which was in the drain.We went ahead and had the tank emptied. The septic company recommended yeast.I decided to research, ended up here.Think I’ll stick with what’s worked,RidX.

14 TerryP { 05.13.16 at 5:05 pm }

Yeast does not produce bacteria for your septic system but it does help to break down the starches which is one of five types of waste found in your septic tank the other four are Proteins, fibers, greases, and pectin. Some experts believe that Yeast can be harmful because it can cause frothing which hinder grease and other solids from settling. I read that Rid-X is mostly yeast I have also heard that bakers yeast is better to use than Rid-X because Rid-X tends to cake up causing potential clogs. I am not an expert just someone who has researched many different sources and this is my conclusion of what the most reputable sources are saying.

15 Jeff Curtis { 05.12.16 at 4:45 pm }

Thanks for this helpful post on septic tank maintenance. I just moved into a home with a septic tank, and I have never dealt with one before. I think that I would like to find a good way to maintain it naturally. I like how you compared our own digestive system to a septic tank system. I will be sure to figure out how often I need to clean my septic tank. Thanks for the help!
http://www.biosystems2000.com.au/products

16 Dewey { 04.16.17 at 3:12 pm }

Makes sense , I actually make sauerkraut from cabbage I grow and the bacteria that turned it into sauerkraut are already present on the cabbage. Litchins eat the sugars in the cabbage turning it into sauerkraut in 14 weeks.

17 derpppp { 09.01.16 at 1:42 am }

are you sure it wasn’t sauerkraut? probiotic cultures in sauerkraut keep sewage broken down

18 ccastor0507 { 04.11.16 at 12:04 am }

My parents used shredded cabbage for over 30 years and never had any issues. Is this still considered a good idea to use. Also does anyone know if the yeast should be put down the kitchen sink for cleaning

19 Arleen sandberg { 03.25.16 at 7:09 pm }

It’s amazing that every so called septic expert gives different answers to the same questions. Is there a real live source out there who can scientifically tell all as well as reply to the above comments? So confusing and oft contradictory. Help!

20 matt { 03.15.16 at 12:07 pm }

I was told potash works ?

21 TINA CONKLIN { 05.12.17 at 12:36 pm }

You said you cut slivers of yeast from donut shop. Can you elaborate on what size slivers and how often done. Than you as I am new to septic systems.

22 Dennis { 03.05.16 at 3:28 pm }

Kris your leach field may need to be replaced or repaired where the farmer drove over it. If the thing fills up the effluent is not flowing. Get out there in the spring and dig out one of the dents from the tires. If the pipe is crushed time to patch it. No need to replace the whole finger. PVC couplings and some glue to be had at any big box or small hardware store. We use yeast from the donut shop. Cut it in slivers and flush. Installed in 1988 to 2002 had it pumped and the guy said uh, no solids keep up whatever your doing no need to pump.

23 Mike Brain { 02.28.16 at 11:33 am }

Good article Deborah.

My father-in-law has a septic system which has the draining from the house come to a crawl. We believe it is mostly due to using harmful chemicals such as bleach in cleaning products. Is there a good way to “recharge” the system? They have it pumped every 2 years but never inspected. In other words, they stick a hose down the pipe but never remove the lid to take a look inside.

Will the yeast trick mentioned do it or will we have to go a more expensive route.

Thank you.

24 Lillian Schaeffer { 01.27.16 at 7:19 pm }

This is some great information, and I appreciate your point that if you wait until there’s a problem with your septic system to have it pumped, you’ve waited too long. My plumbing has been draining pretty slowly recently, and I’m not sure what the problem is. It’s been a while since I’ve had my septic tank pumped, so I’ll definitely look into having that done to see if that was the source of the issue. Thanks for the great post! http://WatersSepticService.com

25 Drew Harrison { 09.16.15 at 12:54 pm }

I had no idea that yeast was useful beyond baking. I know I have been having some septic problems lately too. Next time I’m making some cookies, I’ll grab some yeast and flush it down the toilet! Thanks for this great info and tips!
http://falcann.com/septic_cleaning.html

26 Deanna R. Jones { 09.09.15 at 3:58 pm }

I’m a fan of using natural methods, so learning about using natural methods to maintain my septic tank seems right up my alley. Flushing dry baking yeast down the toilet every four months seems like a really interesting tip. If the live bacteria in yeast can help to break down solids, then maybe it would be worth trying. Thanks for the tips!
http://www.croomesanitation.com/

27 ED { 10.24.16 at 5:23 am }

Has anyone answered this question yet? I have a leech field that does the same….

28 pollyanna thurmond { 08.26.15 at 11:50 am }

Should the ground above the septic system have trouble growing grass and have yellow grass or is this because there has been bleach in the products? Can oxy clean or other whitening detergents be used in the laundry ?

29 Kyle Ross { 08.12.15 at 6:21 pm }

Knowing the location of your septic system is a good idea. The last time we had to have ours pumped, it took a while to find and we had to dig in several places in the yard. You can save a lot of time and effort by keeping record of where it is. I also liked your tip about flushing yeast down the toilet. I will definitely try that! http://www.gordonsepticwaterservice.ca

30 Stephie smith { 06.23.15 at 9:48 am }

It’s crazy how long people go without checking their septic tank. It seems to be a commodity that people take for granted, and don’t really think about until it’s causing issues. It’s good to know that I should avoid using bleach to clean my toilets. I’ll try flushing a 1/2 cup of yeast as well, it wouldn’t hurt. Thank you! srsliquidwaste.com.au

31 Joey Vicars { 04.04.15 at 1:30 am }

Septic systems when serviced or pumped ever 3 to 5 years needs no special additives to work. Ridex or yeast cakes is not needed. But if it helps you sleep better at night then by all means use them

32 Darrell { 03.28.15 at 5:00 am }

It just occurred to me should people with septic systems also avoid spiting our mouth wash into the sinks after brushing your teeth that will flow into the septic tank also? Is what little mouth wash you spit out enough to harm and kill the good bacteria especially when you consider each person that lives in the house twice a day?

33 Lori { 03.27.15 at 3:01 pm }

i get nasty “odors” from my toilets occasionally and bleach helps get rid of them. Does anyone know why this happens? Tank was pumped within the last couple of yrs so it’s not time for that……

34 Gaylan { 03.26.15 at 11:52 pm }

This article does not indicate if this applies to aerobic septic systems. I am guessing that many of the systems refers to here are not. I have no lateral or leech lines. Three sprinkler heads in my back forty as I call it. My system requires the addition of chlorine as the effluent goes into the last tank. My wife and I have lived here for almost 11 years and the system has not been pumped. The company that maintains the system says there is not enough build up yet. Note that we NEVER put anything down the garbage disposer. If it will compost it goes in the compost bin. If not the trash.

35 Sandy { 03.26.15 at 10:19 pm }

A man who has a septic tank service told us to buy a gallon of whole milk and let it go bad a few days and flush it into the septic tank to feed the bacteria. He said to do this about once a month.

36 Susan Higgins { 03.27.15 at 9:22 am }

Hi Teresa Anderson, the article states you can simply buy packaged yeast such as Fleishmans.

37 Teresa anderson { 03.26.15 at 6:02 pm }

Where do I buy yeast for septic a?

38 Kris { 03.26.15 at 11:57 am }

What about vinegar as a cleansor? Baking soda? Lemon/salt? I’ve been where I am for two years and they’ve had to empty the tank three times. Add a helpful neighbor mowing our lawn for us drove his tractor over the leach lines. We were told just add top soil? Doesn’t seem right.

39 Kelly { 03.26.15 at 11:45 am }

People labor under the erroneous idea keeping your septic healthy allows them to avoid pumping.

Keeping your tank healthy is like an investment in that it results in thousands you wont have to pay out [and inconvenience you wont have to suffer].

Septic systems must drain off liquid (effluent). If everything going into a tank were broken down, then carried out into the drain field, the solids, even if iniscule, would build over time and plug the drain field.

Pumping the tank rids it of the fats and oils that build on the top (the crust). While normal, it shouldn’t be allowed to grow for decades, since it, essentially, would reduce space for effluent.

Pumping tanks also remove the solids that settle to the bottom of the tank and rise, over time, to meet the crust, so also reduce tank size for effluent.

On the other side of the coin, a system should not be pumped too often either.

In short, have your tank pumped consistent with use.

40 Melissa Priest { 03.26.15 at 10:40 am }

Rid x does nothing for your septic. It’s not live bacteria. Our well/ septic supplier sells a live bacteria for the septic that you add once a year. Pretty cheap too.

41 Pam Moore { 03.26.15 at 10:12 am }

does yeast work in a grease trap also? If not, what do you recommend?

42 LeaG { 03.26.15 at 8:58 am }

do you have to flush the yeast down all toilets in a house or does doing just one work?

43 darcy { 03.26.15 at 8:49 am }

also watch for “anti-bacterial” and “anti-septic” on your cleaning products. Do not buy or use the septic additives. You have active bacterial in what you flush. NO baby wipes or tampons. Dont have your water softner or sump pumps discharge to the tank. Dont plant on top of or near the tank or discharge field. Dont drive heavy equipment on your tank or field….You left alot out of this article….

44 Renee { 03.26.15 at 7:50 am }

These are the AI’s of Rid-x, I looked them up, they are enzymes, and would not appear to hurt the septic system. I will however switch to yeast due to its recommendation from TOH.

Cellulase breaks down toilet paper, vegetable matter and some foods
Lipase breaks down fats, oils and grease
Protease breaks down proteins
Amylase breaks down starches

45 trey { 03.26.15 at 7:28 am }

Do not use Ridex, it kills the good bacteria.

46 Renee { 03.26.15 at 7:20 am }

We use Ridex, I wonder what the active ingredient is in that? I think we’ll switch to yeast and stop using bleach, great ideas.

47 Dave { 03.25.15 at 3:48 pm }

My wife went to a garden club meeting where a “professional” was talking to them about gardening over septic tanks. The person basically told them all of those septic treatments
like the yeast ones I had been using for years was a waste of money. I am not talking about the drain cleaners, I am talking about treatments. I still use brewers yeast anyway. Maybe the guy was trying to drum up business.

48 ali { 03.25.15 at 10:30 am }

Interesting about the yeast…..if I pour yeast down into our outhouse at the lake would this help to break down matter?

49 Roberta Skinner { 03.25.15 at 9:29 am }

We also stopped using antibacterial hand soaps due to having a septic system.

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