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July 16th Partial Lunar Eclipse: Who Gets To See It?

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July 16th Partial Lunar Eclipse: Who Gets To See It?

On the evening of July 16, 2019, many parts of the world will be able to watch a partial lunar eclipse (also known as a partial eclipse of the Moon).  The Moon will pass through the southern part of the Earth’s shadow, and at mid-eclipse, nearly two-thirds of ist upper portion will be immersed in the Earth’s dark umbral shadow.

What Causes a Lunar Eclipse?

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth passes between the Sun and Moon and lines up precisely so that it blocks the Sun’s light, which otherwise reflects off the Moon.

There are three types of lunar eclipses: total, partial, and penumbral, with the most dramatic being a total lunar eclipse—when the Earth’s shadow totally covers the Moon. A lunar eclipse can occur only when there is a full Moon.

Who Gets To See It?

This event will be seen in Africa, Europe, and western Asia. Most of South America will see the Moon rise already within the Earth’s shadow. Conversely, for central and eastern Asia and Australia, the eclipse will still be in progress when the Moon sets.

Unfortunately, North American will be completely shut out—the eclipse will take place during the daytime with the Moon below the horizon.

See the eclipse path map here.

Lunar Eclipse Timetable (EDT):

Moon enters penumbra: 2:43 p.m.
Moon enters umbra: 4:01 p.m.
Mid-eclipse: 5:30 p.m.
Moon leaves umbra: 6:59 p.m.
Moon leaves penumbra: 8:17 p.m.
 of the Eclipse: 0.653

This will be the last time the Moon enters Earth’s dark umbral shadow until the total lunar eclipse on May 26, 2021!

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