Farmers Almanac
The Farmers Almanac
BUY The 2018 Almanac NOW!

Fata Morgana: The Strange Mirages at Sea

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Add to Google+ Share on Pinterest Subscribe by Email Print This Post
Fata Morgana: The Strange Mirages at Sea

The term “Fata Morgana” sounds fantastical — and if you’ve ever witnessed one, you’ll agree that it looks like something not from this world. To put it simply, Fata Morgana is a type of mirage, one that is normally associated with the open ocean but can also be seen at times on land. It takes its name from Arthurian legend, named for the sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was said to use these images to lure unwitting sailors into her traps.

This type of mirage is responsible for all kinds of unusual sightings, from mountains in the middle of the ocean to ships that appear to by flying, and it may even be the source of the legend of the Flying Dutchman.

The Flying Dutchman, Ghost Ship at Sea
According to lore, the Flying Dutchman is a ghost ship doomed to sail the seas forever. Historians believe that this tale originated in the 17th century. In more recent years, particularly in the 19th and 20th centuries, sailors reported seeing light coming from the ghost ship as the Flying Dutchman tries to signal the dead. Legend has it that seeing the Flying Dutchman is a sure sign of doom at sea.

Most experts today believe that the Flying Dutchman can be explained by the Fata Morgana phenomenon. It is well documented that this type of mirage can make far off ships look like they are floating well above the water so it makes sense that sailors in the 1600s and beyond would see this mirage and, unaware of this natural phenomenon, assume it to be something supernatural.

(Continued Below)

The tale of the Flying Dutchman ghost ship likely came from sailors seeing Fata Morgana.

The Conditions That Cause Fata Morgana
For a Fata Morgana to appear, the atmospheric conditions have to be just right. It starts with a cold air mass close to the ground or surface of the water that is topped by a warm layer of air higher in the atmosphere. Although Fata Morgana can occur on land, they are more common at sea because water helps to form the cool air layer required.

During a Fata Morgana sighting, rays of light passing through the warm and cool air masses are bent strangely and that is what makes the mirage appear. Usually the image is based on a real object, such as a far-off ship, just distorted to appear surreal. People report seeing floating ships, ships that appear to be flying upside down, or even landmasses that aren’t really there. Sometimes people even report flying cities, although there is some question as to whether sky bound cities are a type of Fata Morgana or some other unusual weather phenomenon. Interestingly, the farther away from a Fata Morgana you are, the taller the mirage appears to be.

Where Are Some Common Places to See Fata Morgana?
Fata Morgana most often occurs at sea and there are certain places around the world that seem more prone to these mirages than other places. For instance, Fata Morgana often appears in Antarctica, viewable from the McMurdo Station. In the early 1800s, several Fata Morgana sightings in the northern Arctic led to the “discovery” of land masses that didn’t really exist, including the mythical Crocker Mountains and the Crocker Land Mass.

Closer to home, Fata Morgana sightings are quite common among the Great Lakes. On Lake Ontario, there have been many sightings of ships and islands. One of the most notable sightings was in July 1866, sailors reported seeing a 300-foot tall island along with a ship that appeared to be sailing upside down through the air.
In various places along the Great Lakes, you can also sometimes see mirages of cities or parts of the coastline. The Canadian coast has mysteriously appeared to residents of Buffalo, New York during a Fata Morgana event and flying ships have been seen from places like Marquette, Michigan.

The Californian coastal waters also sometimes produce Fata Morgana sightings, usually ships and islands but also mirages that appear to be massive walls of water.

Have you ever witnessed the Fata Morgana with your own eyes? If so, share your story in the comments section!

Ship image by thriol @ flikr

Articles you might also like...

0 comments

There are no comments yet...

Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment

Note: Comments that further the discussion of the above content are likely to be approved. Those comments that are vague or are simply submitted in order to promote a product, service or web site, although not necessarily considered "spam," are generally not approved.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1919, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.

Spring Is Here – Sign Up Today!

The Farmers' Almanac is a gardener's best friend. Get 365 days of access to our online weather and gardening calendars + a copy of the 2017 Almanac
for only $13.99 $11.99!

Subscribe Today »