Current Moon Phase:

Waning Gibbous

Waning Gibbous

87% Of Full

Can Aches and Pains Predict the Rain?

Do your joints really ache worse when cold, wet weather is on the way or is that just a myth? Find out!

“Oh, my bones are aching. It must be about to rain.” Chances are, you’ve either uttered these words yourself, or heard them from an older relative. The idea that body aches can predict the weather is a very ancient bit of weather lore, illustrated by the following old saying:

A coming storm your shooting corns presage,
And aches will throb, your hollow tooth will rage.

This belief is as persistent and widespread as it is old. Countless people with no interest in weather folklore — those people who don’t care how wide the orange stripe is on the back of a woolly bear caterpillar, or whether it’s better for the sky to be red in the morning or at night — repeat this one every day, and with good reason.

The Weather-Joint Aches Connection

While not every piece of old weather lore is true, evidence seems to suggest that this one is based in fact. As far back as the 1960s, medical researchers have found, over and over again, that there is a genuine connection between increased pain and cold, wet weather. While the effect is most commonly linked to arthritis sufferers, many have also reported feeling increased pain from nerve disorders, recently healed fractures, migraines, toothaches, corns, and even scars, when the weather was about to change.

No one knows exactly what causes aches and pains to flare up, but the most likely culprit is the drop in atmospheric pressure that occurs right before a storm begins. This shift in air pressure may be enough to dilate the blood vessels in the body, stimulating the nerve endings in sensitive areas, like sore feet, creaky knees, or bad teeth.

Can you predict the weather by aches or pains? Share your experiences here.

Farmers' Almanac - Itch
Jaime McLeod

Jaime McLeod is a longtime journalist who has written for a wide variety of newspapers, magazines, and websites, including MTV.com. She enjoys the outdoors, growing and eating organic food, and is interested in all aspects of natural wellness.

Keep Exploring

guest
16 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
N.P.

I had a foot injury and my pain always flares up more when rain is coming. Rain is coming today and my foot is throbbing right now.

Chris

I definitely get a dull achy pain along my neck, shoulder and upper back. Early onset of arthritis and fibromyalgia. Sometimes it’s the feeling of pins and needles with a mild burning sensation whenever I touch the area in pain. I noticed popping and crunchy sounds when trying to massage the knots and stiff areas.

It’s especially bad during the winter and on rainy days like today. I can always tell if it’s raining even when I try to ignore the signs by distracting myself. It never works. The amount of pain isn’t every day and is very distinct. I actually made the connection years ago and did research myself to try to see if it was my imagination or if there was a connection. That’s when I was introduced to biometric pressure. The inflammation is 11/10 today. Started last night and I woke up hearing the sound of rain. I don’t care who tries to debunk this and what their credentials are.. my body confirms with a decade experience.

Pam

Yes I can. I broke my right foot in several places in a car accident in 1996. Ever since it aches a little right before it rains.

Nancy

So what is causing my head to hurt and neck I have had it since before Christmas I have gotten new pillows still have it ! Rain or shine hurts most of the time! Go to bed hurting wake up hurting! Hurts all day! I have been to Dr after Dr. No one can find the cause what will help? Is iT the weather!? I wish I knew so it will stop! I can not take it much anymore!!!

Marlene

Nancy, I had those problems so I got a flat pillow. Nice difference! No more neck/shoulder pain

Levieta Haulk

At my age, arthritis is very present all around my body.
I do see increased pain in cold or wet weather. So yes, I can predict the weather by my body. 😍

Mary

I’m 77 and for years could predict the change in the weather before the weatherman!! My Dr said it is the change in the barometric pressure. She said the pressure change causes the fluid in the joints to swell up, thus resulting in pain.

Shine

I definitely know when the weather is coming in. My pain levels go up significantly. I have arthritis and fibromyalgia. It has been this way for years.

C.C.

Severe weather such as storms, blizzards and hurricanes with trigger migraines for me, even when hundreds of miles away from the coast. I’m in WV and had migraines lasting days as hurricanes are in the gulf or even near Puerto Rico. Also I’ll get get headaches once the barometer hits 30.06 or lower, the lower the more severe the headaches with many becoming migraines. It’s currently raining right now and I’ve got a pressure headache so I just checked the weather stats and the barometer is at 30.01 and rising. The worst I’ve ever had was a migraine that lasted almost 6 days, nothing I took helped. My children knew how bad I felt, took care of me, they tried to comfort me and tried to get me to eat. I couldn’t even stand light, sound, or smell of food. I barely ate anything. My oldest was about 13 (now 35), he told me there were 4 or 5 hurricanes approaching or near the US pretty much in cessation. Some hit us, some Mexico while others turned out to sea but until they weakened, I was in agony. I always dread hurricane season because it’s migraine season for me.

Susan Higgins

Thanks for sharing, C.C.

Choralen LaSalle

I AM 67. And I can pretty much guarantee my knees, hips, and healed broken wrist aches when there is a change coming in weather, Especially in the fall and winter months! I also get headaches…So believe it or not, I KNOW it isn’t fake!

Kristin Decker

Thank heaven I don’t have those abilities. NOR do I have the aches & pains that go with them 🙂

Gina

I usually get the start of a headache right before it rains and sometimes during. My doctor and I believe it has to do with the barometric pressure.

Jackie

I also believe that it is the barometric pressure. Wind also seems to cause joint pain.

Bill

Wind results from differing barometric pressures – air moving from high to low pressure systems. So you’re right on.

Jackie

Thank you for the information.

Plan Your Day. Grow Your Life.

Sign up today for inspiring articles, tips & weather forecasts!

{"cart_token":"","hash":"","cart_data":""}