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Farmers’ Almanac Planting Calendar

Welcome to the Farmers’ Almanac Planting Calendar, also known as the “Gardening by the Moon” calendar.

This planting calendar helps you pick the best dates for popular garden tasks—starting seeds, pruning shrubs, harvesting, weeding, and much more.

Our suggestions are according to a 200-year-old formula that relies on phases of the Moon and its position within the zodiac. Our readers swear they “won’t plant without it.” Learn more about Gardening by the Moon.

The dates listed below are consistent across all growing zones. This means you must consider your weather and climate before following our suggestions.

For best results, talk with your local greenhouse or agricultural extension office for the optimal window of time within which to use these dates.

Note, you can find a glossary of our gardening terms below the calendar.

Happy gardening!

Plan Your Best Garden!  Here’s one month of our Gardening by the Moon Calendar. Get the next 12 Months by Joining Our Farmhouse Now. Already a member? Sign in

January 2023
  • 27th – 29th
    Fine for planting beans, peppers, cucumbers, melons, and other aboveground crops where climate is suitable.
  • 30th – 31st
    Poor days for planting, seeds tend to rot in ground.
February 2023
  • 1st – 3rd
    Plant seedbeds and flower gardens. Fine for planting beans, tomatoes, corn, cotton, cucumbers, peppers, melons, and other aboveground crops where climate allows.
  • 4th – 8th
    Clear ground, turn sod, kill plant pests.
  • 9th – 10th
    Fine for sowing grains, hay, and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable days for planting root crops.
  • 11th – 12th
    Start seedbeds. Good days for transplanting. Plant carrots, turnips, onions, beets, Irish potatoes, and other root crops in the South. Lettuce and other leafy vegetables will do well.
  • 13th – 14th
    Poor planting days. Good harvest days.
  • 15th – 17th
    Any root crops that can be planted now will do well.
  • 18th – 18th
    Barren day. Fine for clearing, plowing, fertilizing, and killing plant pests. Good harvest day.
  • 19th – 21st
    Extra good for cucumbers, peas, cantaloupes, and other vine crops. Set strawberry plants. First day is a good day for transplanting. First day is also favorable for onions, carrots, sweet potatoes, beets, and other root crops where climate permits. Last two days are when to plant peppers, sweet corn, tomatoes, and other aboveground crops in southern Florida, California, and Texas.
  • 22nd – 23rd
    Seeds planted now will grow poorly and yield little.
  • 24th – 25th
    Fine for planting beans, peppers, cucumbers, melons, and other aboveground crops where climate is suitable.
  • 26th – 27th
    Any seed planted now will tend to rot.
  • 28th – 28th
    Plant seedbeds and flower gardens. Fine for planting beans, tomatoes, corn, cotton, cucumbers, peppers, melons, and other aboveground crops where climate allows.

Farmers’ Almanac Official Gardening Terms Cheat Sheet

Above ground crops: Crops that produce their yield above the soil (corn, peppers, squash, etc.)

Root Crops: Crops that produce their yield below the soil (potatoes, radishes, carrots, etc.)

Seedbeds
: A bed of soil cultivated for planting seeds or seedlings before being transplanted.

Seedlings
: Young plants—especially ones that grow from seeds (rather than from a cutting).

Transplanting: To uproot and replant a growing plant or an already well-established plant.

The terms “Favorable,” “Good,” and “Best” are all considered beneficial days for planting. “Favorable” and  “Good” mean the same thing. However, “Best” is considered the optimal day for planting seeds.


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Join The Discussion!

How long have you been a gardener?

What are your plans for gardening this season?

What questions do you have for the Farmers’ Almanac?

Become a part of our community!

Tell us more about your experience in the comments below.

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MRS.DANYELLE

WE’VE LEARNED OVER THE YEARS TALKING TO YOUR GARDEN, LIKE YOU WOULD TALK TO YOUR YOUNG CHILDREN. WITH A SWEET GENTLE VOICE.WHATCH HOW BEAUTIFUL IT BECOMES MORE BEAUTIFUL THAN YOU COULD HAVE IMAGINED.

Heather Dougherty

Thank you for sharing this – I talk to my plants all the time!

Sita

I didn’t know and I plant today

Andy Aziz

From experience all information is correct 💯

Heather Dougherty

Thank you! We are happy to have you as part of our community!

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