Farmers Almanac
The Farmers Almanac
Pre-Order
The 2019 Almanac Today!

How To Stop Being A Mosquito Magnet!

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Add to Google+ Share on Pinterest Share on LinkedIn Subscribe by Email Print This Post
How To Stop Being A Mosquito Magnet!

Mosquitoes are a pesky nuisance for many this time of year. Besides the irritating itch, infectious mosquito–transmitted diseases such as malaria, West Nile virus, dengue fever, yellow fever, encephalitis, chikungunya, and Zika are still threats throughout the world. But there are easy things you can do to stop being a mosquito magnet.

Mosquito Facts

Some people are more likely to be bitten by mosquitoes than others. Understanding how mosquitoes select their target, what they are attracted to, and what they find offensive, could hold the key to preventing mosquito bites.

With its keen sense of smell, mosquitoes can detect its next victim up to 55 yards (50 meters) away. Only the female mosquito bites, males do not. The female mosquito needs the iron and protein in your blood to produce eggs.

Scents that Draw Mosquitoes:

  • Carbon Dioxide –The larger the person, the more carbon dioxide they tend to exhale, which mosquitoes (and black flies) find irresistible. Adults are more apt to be bitten by mosquitoes than small children. Pregnant women also produce more carbon dioxide, and are more susceptible to pesky bites.
  • Movement and Heat – If you’re outdoors and physically active on a hot summer evening, you could be attracting mosquitoes in your direction. Mosquitoes find you less appealing when you’re stationary. Opt for the hammock.
  • Body Odor – Sweat does not have a scent until bacteria develops. It’s old sweat that mosquitoes find enticing. Research indicates that mosquitoes are especially drawn to smelly feet and socks. If you’re about to head outdoors at dawn or dusk or in a waterfront area where mosquitoes are prevalent, shower first. Wear clean socks every time you venture outdoors. Entertaining outdoors in mosquito country? Lure mosquitoes away from you by hanging a smelly gym sock from a tree branch well outside the area.
  • Lactic Acid – Your muscles produce lactic acid during vigorous exercise. When you are active or eating specific foods, your skin emits lactic acid. The more lactic acid on your skin, the greater your chances of getting bitten by mosquitoes. Shower before heading outdoors to remove any build-up on your skin. Exercise outside during daylight hours only to avoid bites.

While there are things that you can do to avoid mosquito bites, there are certain things you cannot change. Certain body secretions that you can’t control attract mosquitoes. People also emit different scents based on their blood type. If you have Type O blood, you are naturally more susceptible to bites than those with Type A, which mosquitoes are least drawn to.

(Continued Below)

Researchers are seeking ways to minimize or mask the human scents that attract mosquitoes.

Scents that Repel Mosquitoes:

  • Chickens – Scientists report that mosquitoes stay clear of most birds. In Ethiopia researchers conducted a study using live chickens, humans, and mosquitoes. They found that the scent chickens give off kept the human participants from getting bitten by mosquitoes. Scientists are working on extracting certain chicken compounds to formulate a repellent, to stop the spread of disease. In the meantime, if you have chickens, allowing them to free range outdoors not only increases the amount of vitamin D in the eggs it lays, but may keep you from getting mosquito bites.
  • Garlic – Consuming fresh garlic on a regular basis, or taking a garlic supplement may cause your skin to emit a scent that mosquitoes and ticks find offensive.
  • B1 vitamin (thiamine) – Taking a B1 vitamin supplement or wearing a thiamine skin patch may cause your skin to give off a scent that only mosquitoes will detect and find unpleasant. Since this vitamin is water-soluble toxicity is not a concern. Ask your healthcare provider for dosage recommendations.
  • Natural plant-based oils – Oil of eucalyptus, lemon eucalyptus, cinnamon leaf oil, citronella, and soybean-oil based repellents are safer for use than the chemical-based repellents like DEET, which have the potential for causing adverse health effects.

Want more ways to combat mosquitos? Take a look!

Attract Beneficial Bats To Your Garden

Repelling Mosquitos – a timely tip!

Make Your Own Natural Bug Repellent

Poison Ivy Soap


Price: $5.99

Poison ivy itch relief in a soap! An old Native American remedy for poison ivy calls for making a paste made from the crushed leaves and stems of the Jewelweed plant, also known as "touch-me-not." Fortunately you don't need to hunt down jewelweed to get relief. Our mild Poison Ivy Jewelweed Soap contains the juices from jewelweed, along with soothing coconut, olive and palm oils, to effectively remove the nasty urushiol (the invisible plant oil) that causes the itching, burning rash of poison ivy. Use in bath or shower or rub onto areas that have been exposed. Made in Maine and ready for the spring gardening/weeding season.

Shop Now »

Articles you might also like...

8 comments

1 Susan Higgins { 05.23.18 at 4:01 pm }

Hi Dreighton Rosier, there are some good olive oil-based soaps or Castile soaps that are fragrance free. Kirk’s is a good one to try, and it’s fairly inexpensive.

2 Dreighton Rosier { 05.23.18 at 3:23 pm }

Soaps to use when taking the showers recommended in this paper? I do not like the perfumed products and prefer unscented but those are hard to find in body soaps.

3 Susan Higgins { 05.23.18 at 4:05 pm }

Thanks LJ Bickle for this information. In doing a little digging we found this study: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2002-06/ncsu-mrb061002.php

4 LJ Bickle { 05.23.18 at 12:52 pm }

As far back as I can remember, mosquitos come after me (I’m now over 59). I’m not large, I eat garlic, and I have A blood. BTW: I saw a program years ago which showed that a person with tomato juice rubbed on his/her arm’s skin wasn’t getting bitten in a mosquito infested area (but the other two people were, and they used other repellents like DEET). The only thing is, I couldn’t tell if they were talking about prepared/commercial tomato juice (from a can or jar), or if the unbitten person used a fresh-cut tomato which got rubbed onto the arm). Maybe both works, but I’ve never tried either version of tomato juice on my skin).

5 Esther Decker { 05.23.18 at 10:15 am }

Drinking a glass of water with apple cider vinegar and honey mixed in will help repel mosquitoes too, if you drink it on a daily basis.

6 Louie Acor { 09.29.16 at 8:04 pm }

It’s actually a nice and useful piece of information. I’m happy that you shared this helpful info with us. Please stay us informed like this. Thank you for sharing.

http://jetbluevirtual.net/pilots/hubs/

7 D Newell { 08.25.16 at 5:15 am }

I found out that the brown Listerine mouth wash works really well in keeping mosquitos
off of you…just put in a spray bottle and spray all over you…keep your eyes closed…also spray in area that you’re in outside…I like to spray my front porch area and they don’t come around….also good for mosquitos bites…takes the itch out and disinfects as well…Listerine was invented as a antiseptic to use during surgery years ago….so it won’t hurt you….

8 Denise Howell { 08.24.16 at 9:36 am }

My boyfriend eats Garlic often but like him anyway

Leave a Comment

Note: Comments that further the discussion of the above content are likely to be approved. Those comments that are vague or are simply submitted in order to promote a product, service or web site, although not necessarily considered "spam," are generally not approved.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1919, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.

Spring Is Here – Sign Up Today!

The Farmers' Almanac is a gardener's best friend. Get 365 days of access to our online weather and gardening calendars + a copy of the 2017 Almanac
for only $13.99 $11.99!

Subscribe Today »