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Summer Forecast 2019: Another Sizzler On Tap?

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Summer Forecast 2019: Another Sizzler On Tap?

Summer in the Northern Hemisphere officially begins on Friday, June 21, 2019, at 11:54 a.m. EDT, the date of the Summer Solstice. For many, it’s the most anticipated season of the year—school’s out and it’s time for family vacations, cookouts, swimming, boating, fishing, and other outdoor activities. But if the weather doesn’t cooperate, these events could turn out to be a bust. So what’s the summer forecast? Will it be a repeat of last summer’s hot and steamy conditions? See what we’re predicting for the U.S. and Canada.

2019 U.S. Summer Forecast

Will summer 2019’s weather be a repeat of 2018’s hot, steamy sizzler? 

How Hot Will Summer Be?

According to our time-tested, 202-year-old weather formula, summer 2019 overall should see near-normal, summer temperatures across much of the nation—but there will be exceptions. The central and southwestern states are on tap for a very hot summer, especially in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona (Zone 7) in June and July.

Dangerous Thunderstorms?

What’s summer without thunderstorms? In late June, the central states (Zones 4 and 5) should expect a bout of dangerous weather with the potential to spawn thunderstorms capable of producing large hail, damaging straight-line winds, and even a devastating tornado threat. Meanwhile, oppressively high humidity paired with frequent thunderstorms will be the rule for the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida (Zone 3) during July.

A Case of the Muggies for the Northeast

Above-normal summertime precipitation is expected east of the Mississippi. Much of our summer forecast predicts lots of rain, thunderstorms, and wetness during July and August in the Northeast and New England areas (Zone 1). The increased clouds and showers will likely keep temperatures below the dozen or so 90 degree days that might otherwise occur. However, you should count on days with temps well up into the ’80s. Add to that the above-normal precipitation, and you’ve got oppressively humid and uncomfortable conditions. So if you’re not a fan of muggy weather, you might want to be sure the A/C is tuned up and ready to go—it’s going to get quite a workout!

Read: What did people do before air conditioning? 

For the Great Lakes, Ohio Valley & Midwest (Zone 2), we’re predicting heat and humidity to build in June and July to be a stormy, warm month. And while we’re calling for near-to-below normal precipitation west of the Mississippi, a stormy summer is on tap for this region overall. Some bouts of severe weather may rumble through in late July. Some of the storms, especially for parts of Michigan, are capable of large hail.

Where Will Summer Be Dry?

It looks like the Pacific Northwest (Zone 6) can expect a drier-than-usual summer, despite the fact that the first days of the new season start off with some showery weather. As far as temperatures are concerned, this zone can expect pleasant and fair conditions all the way through to August.

Farmers' Almanac 2019 Summer Outlook map

2019 US Summer Outlook

Will it rain on your July 4th cookout? Check out our detailed weather forecast for your zone here.

2019 Hurricane Outlook

As far as tropical cyclones are concerned, it appears that the southeast U.S. (Zone 3) will be exclusively in the crosshairs. Officially, hurricane season does not get underway until June 1st, but we’re predicting an early season tropical disturbance to threaten in the mid-to-latter part of May. A tropical storm could again pose a threat in mid-June, and following a lull in July and August, a hurricane threat could evolve in mid-September and mid-October. The traditional peak of hurricane season is September 10th.

2019 Hurricane Names
How Much Do You Know About Hurricanes? Take Our Quiz!

 

Summer Survival Kit

Tips, Tricks & Hacks to Maximize Your Summer Fun!

Critter & Itch Control

Natural Tick Remedies That Work!
Beware of These Itchy Plants!
Make Your Own Natural Bug Repellent

Gardening

What To Plant To Keep The Bugs Away
Easiest Veggies To Grow In Containers
Gardening by the Moon Calendar —pick the best days for planting!

Beat The Heat

Why Are They Called The Dog Days of Summer?
Pet Safety In Summer Heat

Planning your vacation? Get a more detailed, advance forecast for your Zone here so you pick the right week!

Enjoy the Outdoors

Best Camping Tips
Lightning Safety Quiz!

Fishing Fun

8 Fun Ways To Hook Kids on Fishing
5 Tips for Fishing in the Rain
Fishing Calendar – Pick the best days to fish in 2019

 

Looking for the 2019 Canadian Summer Forecast? See page 2 >

Pages: 1 2

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4 comments

1 Liz { 08.07.19 at 3:06 pm }

I live in Central CA, we are having a the coolest August I’ve ever experienced. For the record I am a farmer who keeps track of the weather. So I came to this site to compare the month of August to other years and compare my notes. To my surprise Farmers Almanac temperatures in August are not showing years of 100 plus degrees instead they are basically showing this years forecast. On every year I clicked I put in today’s date and went back 15 years not one date showed we were over 100 degrees. Unfortunately none of this is correct and therefore I have came to the conclusion Farmers Almanac is not reliable and just like a lot of companies have sold out to the dollar instead of facts. We have lost our tools that we count on, so we will just have to make new ones to counter the lies. Shame on you.

2 Ginger Roell { 04.25.19 at 10:21 pm }

Would like all of the good information Farmers Almanac provides. Thank you!

3 Susan Higgins { 04.26.19 at 2:01 pm }

Hi Joanne, you can check out our long-range forecast for your zone (Zone 5) here: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/long-range-weather-forecast/south-central-us/

4 Joanne { 04.24.19 at 6:24 pm }

Hi traveling to Fort Wayne In. late July early August from Texas. Any idea what the weather will be traveling?

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