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Peas Planting Guide

Peas Planting Guide

This low-maintenance plant is a summer favorite and a staple in a number of soup and stew recipes. And fun fact: the green pea is one of the oldest cultivated vegetables in the world!

How To Grow Peas

Start: Sow in average soil in early spring for a first crop and late summer for a fall crop. Sow 2” apart in double rows spaced 6” apart with 24” between double rows. Cover with 1” of fine soil. Thin to stand 4-6” apart when seedlings are 1-2” high.

Water: Peas do not do well in overly wet conditions. Keep soil evenly moist but not saturated. Peas require about 1” of rain per week.

Soil: Peas prefer fertile well-drained soil but will tolerate most soils except heavy clay. Average soil with some compost worked into it will suit them wonderfully. pH 5.8-7.0

Light: Full sun.

Fertilize: Peas are legumes are able to capture nitrogen from the air through their leaves. They do not require fertilizing, but if a fertilizer is used, choose one with little or no nitrogen.

Harvest: Harvest peas when the pods look full and are still bright, shiny green. If the peas have started bulging the pod and the pod is dull green, they are past prime.

Notes: Pea seeds can be inoculated with a beneficial bacteria at the time of planting to help them capture more nitrogen from the air.

Helpful Growing Links

Farmer’s Almanac Gardening By the Moon Calendar

Companion Planting: 10 Veggies That Should Grow Together

10 Easiest Fruits, Vegetables, and Herbs to Grow in Pots

What Seeds are Best for Early-Season Plantings?

8 Healthiest Veggies To Eat This Spring

Helpful Tips

Freezing Snow Peas and Sugar Snap Peas

Easy Ways to Save Seeds

Pea Recipes

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  • Curtis D. says:

    Thank you for publishing these “how to grow” articles. I’m especially excited to grow snap peas this summer. I’ve been buying them pickled from my local gas station and hope to try making them on my own. I’ll be bookmarking this page to reference in the future. Thanks again – Curtis D.

  • If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1919, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.

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