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Persimmon Pound Cake—No Preheat!

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Persimmon Pound Cake—No Preheat!

This recipe comes from Melissa Bunker, a.k.a. the Persimmon Lady, who provides us with her persimmon seed forecast each fall. The seeds she reads are from the fruit of her persimmon trees she grows in Central North Carolina. And after she harvests the seeds and makes her predictions, she makes these delicious cakes with the pulp of the ripe fruit. 

If you’ve never had a persimmon and are wondering what they taste like, you can read more about them here.

It’s very important that your persimmon fruits are fully ripe before making this dessert.

Persimmon Lady Poundcake

Ingredients:

2 sticks softened butter
3 cups granulated sugar
1/2 cup shortening
3 cups all-purpose flour
5 whole eggs
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 cup persimmon pulp
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon almond extract

Directions:

Cream butter and shortening with sugar. Add persimmon pulp and extracts. In a separate bowl, sift flour with baking soda. Alternately mix wet ingredients with dry.

Pour the batter into a buttered bundt pan or mini bundt pans.

Bake in a cold oven (don’t preheat!) at 350ºF for 1 hour. Cake is done when toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. 

Cool cake completely and top with persimmon pulp before serving.

Photo from Melissa Bunker.

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