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Pumpkin Cornbread Recipe

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Pumpkin Cornbread Recipe

This fabulous pumpkin cornbread is not too sweet, but the cornmeal makes it interesting enough to disappear quickly.  It is simple to make and oh-so-easy to eat. Serve as a tea bread or toasted lightly for breakfast.

Pumpkin Cornbread

Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients:

1 1/3 cups unbleached 
all-purpose flour
1 cup ground cornmeal
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1 cup canned unsweetened pumpkin
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1/2 cup milk
3/4 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon honey mixed with 1 tablespoon melted butter (optional, to brush on baked loaf)

Directions:

Heat the oven to 350º F (177º C). Grease a 9- by 5-inch loaf pan with oil.  Combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl, until thoroughly mixed.

Whisk together the eggs, pumpkin, butter, and milk in a smaller bowl. Quickly mix this into the flour mixture until just combined. Gently stir in the walnuts.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until the loaf is golden brown and slightly separated from the edge of the pan, and a skewer inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Remove from the pan and brush with the glaze, if using. Cool completely before slicing with a serrated knife.

Excerpted from The Pumpkin Cookbook, © by Edith Stovel, photography © by Clare Barboza, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

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5 comments

1 Susan Higgins { 10.12.18 at 8:28 am }

Hi Paula, you could probably use the baking mix, but you’d have to adjust the leavening ingredients in the recipe to compensate since the baking mix also has it in it, plus salt and other ingredients. Unless you’re a master baker, this might be tricky to make the proper adjustments. We suggest just getting the cornmeal, which is super inexpensive, and you can freeze the remaining cornmeal in a sealable bag if you don’t think you’ll use it up.

2 PAULA SCHMIDT { 10.10.18 at 2:59 pm }

I have some Aunt Jemima White cornmeal baking mix (contains flour and leavening. I wonder if I could substitute it for the cornmeal somehow.

3 Eileen { 10.07.18 at 7:17 am }

Pumpkin can also be added to tomato sauces for extra fiber and it coats pasta really well. I just spoon in a half cup per serving. Low cal too. Pumpkin pie is my favorite but since being forced to give up gluten, I’m still looking for a pastry that can withstand the long baking time for old fashioned pumpkin pie filling.

4 Jan Jones { 10.06.18 at 12:34 pm }

I made the Pumpkin Cornbread yesterday and it is delicious. I bought a jar of Pumpkin Butter from the market and tried that on it ….Yummy!

5 Roger { 10.03.18 at 10:22 am }

Will try corn meal and pumpkin , looks and sounds great. My wife bakes a lot with pumpkin….

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