Where Did The Easter Bunny Come From?

Ever wonder where the Easter Bunny came from? How did the tradition get started? We have the answer.

In 16th century literature, there are accounts of a bunny who, each spring, would reward those who were good with eggs. The first edible Easter rabbits, made out of pastry and sugar, were made in Germany during the early 1800s.

Prior to the Christian holiday of Easter, the hare and rabbit showed up often in pre-Christian fertility lore. These animals often served as symbols of new life during the spring season.

Where Did The Easter Bunny Originate?

How the Easter Bunny tradition began isn’t entirely clear; however, Germany has been credited with the origin of associating a bunny with Easter.

In America, the Easter Bunny was introduced by the German settlers who arrived in the Pennsylvania Dutch country during the 1700s. The arrival of what they referred to the bunny as “Oschter Haws” was considered “childhood’s greatest pleasure” next to a visit from Christ-Kindel on Christmas Eve. The children believed that if they were good the Oschter Haws would lay a nest of colored eggs.

The children would build their nest in a secluded place in the home, the barn or the garden. Boys would use their caps and girls their bonnets to make the nests. The use of elaborate baskets would come later as the tradition of the Easter bunny spread throughout the country.

Happy Easter! Happy Passover, and Happy Spring.

This article was published by the staff at Farmers' Almanac. Interested in becoming a guest author? Contact us to let us know!

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kodster

Let’s be honest. “Easter” didn’t START with celebrating Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection for our sins. It started millennia before, as a pagan ritual… in fact, “Easter’ eggs started with the rolling of eggs in a baby’s blood in worship of the goddess Inanna. Look into that transgender goddess and you’ll find why we have the Virgin Mary and baby Jesus in the Roman Catholic Church’s ‘temples’ (they were originally temples that were converted to churches during Emperor Constantine’s creation of the state religion of Roman Catholicism). All of those pagan idols that God Most High, in Exodus 20:4-5 as part of the 10 Commandments, told us NOT to worship were renamed to biblical people to convert the pagans to worship them. So, this statue of the Virgin Mary and the baby Jesus has been renamed, numerous times over, throughout the millennia… Astheroth (the real origin of the word ‘Easter’) and her baby, Tammuz and her baby, et al.

Now, the story of the Germans, who were mostly Lutherans as well as Roman Catholics (Lutherans were the Protestant Reformation version of RCC, as they kept many of the RCC’s rituals… another thing we’re not supposed to do is these rituals of worship), may have created the Easter bunny icon, and that’s how we ended up with this nonsense of ‘worshipping’ a bunny, rather than Jesus Christ, the Only Begotten Son of God Most High, and that’s why I choose not to observe Easter, today. I know the roots of the pagan rituals involved, and choose to keep God Most High’s ways and commandments. That’s my Joshua 24:15 moment to be obedient to Him, and Him alone. Your choice is up to you.

Gail Lightner

Another twist on the “mixing” of pagan holidays with early Christianity’s observations…..
and you’ll no doubt shoot this down……. The early Christians, as you were sought out and brutally treated for that adherence to Christ’s teachings and invitation to salvation thru His death. And so. The early Church would “piggyback” on the pagan days and do their own observations of celebrating Christ. I’m sure it didn’t always protect them from being brutally treated or killed if found out. In our culture we know nothing of such persecution. However, the day may be close at hand we experience it up close and personal.

A Hyde

LOL

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