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Make Your Own Pickles – It’s Easy!

Got lots of cucumbers this time of year? Make pickles! Here are two easy recipes for homemade pickles that don't require a lot of time or effort.

Got cucumbers? Then why not make pickles? Here are two easy and tasty recipes to use up those cucumbers that have been harvested from your garden or CSA share.

Enjoy!

Dill Pickles

Ingredients:
1 pound cucumbers
4 garlic cloves, peeled
2 teaspoons dill seed
1 cup distilled white vinegar
1 cup water
2 tablespoons pickling salt
1-quart mason jar

Directions:
Wash and dry the cucumbers and cut off the bottom ends. Slice them into spears or rounds. Add the garlic and dill seed to the jar, followed by the cucumber slices. Combine the vinegar, water, and salt in a small sauce pan and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Allow to simmer for 5 minutes, then pour the brine over the cucumbers, leaving half an inch of head space. Allow to cool to room temperature, cover, and refrigerate for up to 1 month. Allow pickles to sit for at least a few days before opening and enjoying. Note: this is not a canning method so they must be kept in the fridge.

And don’t pour out that pickle juice when the pickles are gone! See why!

Sweet Pickles

Ingredients:
2 cups cucumbers, thinly sliced
1/2 cup sweet onion, thinly sliced
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp. celery seed
1 tsp. mustard seed
1 tbsp. coriander
1 tbsp. whole allspice berries
1 tsp. cinnamon
3 cloves
1 tsp. pickling salt
1-quart canning jar or other similarly sized airtight container

Directions:
Place cucumber and onion slices in a large canning jar. Mix vinegar, water, sugar, celery seed, mustard seed, coriander, allspice, cinnamon, cloves, and salt in a medium saucepan and bring to boil over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar and salt. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Pour the hot brine over the cucumbers and onions, leaving at least a half an inch of headspace. Allow to cool, then cover with metal lids and screw on bands. Refrigerate overnight before serving. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 months. Note: this is not a canning method so they must be kept in the fridge.

Jaime McLeod is a longtime journalist who has written for a wide variety of newspapers, magazines, and websites, including MTV.com. She enjoys the outdoors, growing and eating organic food, and is interested in all aspects of natural wellness.

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Sue

I make a similar refrigerated dill with cucumbers from our garden. I make the brine and pour it into a 1-gallon glass jar. Then, as my cucs are the right size (small) I wash them gently and remove the blossom and pop them into the brine. When the cucs are no longer covered with brine, I make more brine and pour it in. I stuff fresh dill weed in each time as well. Do this until the jar is full. I usually make two jars. One for the kitchen fridge and one for the garage fridge. Now I have enough for the two of us for the winter. Yes. Mine keep beautifully for a year. I have been doing this for years now.

steven nelson

This recipe only makes 1 quart????

Susan Higgins

Hi Steven Nelson: yes, this recipe makes 1 quart, but feel free to double or triple the recipe.

Tricia

My mom is on salt restrictions, could these be made without Salt?

Queen Chef Stephanie

excellent excellent

Queen Chef Stephanie

thank you

lance james

excellent

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