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2019 Hurricane Names For The Season

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2019 Hurricane Names For The Season

Have you ever wondered why tropical storms and hurricanes are given names? It’s not to make these disastrous storms seem friendlier, that’s for sure. Storms are given names to make them easier to remember. But who picks the names?

How Are Storms Named?

Prior to the 1950s, meteorologists kept track of hurricanes and tropical storms by the year and the storms’ order for that year. So, for instance, the fifth tropical storm of 1938 was referred to as just that — the “fifth tropical storm of 1938” or “Storm 5.” Tropical storms and hurricanes that did a lot of damage received unofficial names—like the 1926 Great Miami Hurricane, which did so much damage that the Miami government implemented the first known building code in the United States.

During the 1950s, meteorologists realized that it was difficult to keep track of unnamed storms—particularly if there was more than one storm happening at any given time. By 1953, meteorologists around the United States were using names for tropical storms and cyclones. In those days, the storm names were all female. Both male and female names were used for Northern Pacific storms in 1978, and by 1979, male and female names were being used for Atlantic storms, too.

The World Meteorological Organization is responsible for developing the names for both Northern Pacific and Atlantic storms. They use six lists of names for Atlantic Ocean and Eastern North Pacific storms. These lists rotate, one each year. That means every six years, the names cycle back around and get reused (which is what’s happening in 2019). If a hurricane does tremendous damage, such as Katrina, Sandy, or Harvey, the name is retired and replaced by a different name beginning with the same letter (After 2018, Florence and Michael are now added to the list of retired names). The names alternate between male and female names, listed alphabetically and in chronological order starting with A and omitting Q and U, X, Y, and Z.  If more than 21 names are required during a season, the Greek alphabet is used.

Tropical Storms vs. Hurricanes

The National Hurricane Center explains that names are only given to tropical storms that have sustained wind speeds higher than 39 mph. These names will stay with the storm as it reaches hurricane strength (maximum sustained winds of 74 mph or higher). This means Tropical Storm Debby, for example, will become Hurricane Debby if it reaches maturity.

The Atlantic Hurricane season, which officially begins June 1st, peaks September 10th and ends November 30th.

List of 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Names:

These names were recycled from the 2013 season, which was considered a quiet year with no major hurricanes. Did your name make the list?

  1. Andrea
  2. Barry
  3. Chantal
  4. Dorian
  5. Erin
  6. Fernand
  7. Gabrielle
  8. Humberto
  9. Imelda
  10. Jerry
  11. Karen
  12. Lorenzo
  13. Melissa
  14. Nestor
  15. Olga
  16. Pablo
  17. Rebekah
  18. Sebastien
  19. Tanya
  20. Van
  21. Wendy

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34 comments

1 Demi S { 07.15.19 at 11:09 am }

Hurricane Demi
The name is very popular
My full name is Demetria
Stars like Demi Moore Demi Lovato
Demi bra Demi sauce
Why not hurricane Demi

2 Jenny { 07.14.19 at 10:51 pm }

💖Kendall💖 . Need I say more? 💯💯💯

3 Doris Dominick { 07.14.19 at 4:02 pm }

What about adding DORIS to the list

4 Sandy { 07.13.19 at 11:18 pm }

We all can’t be superstorms. Now retired.

5 Claudia Stanley { 07.13.19 at 7:35 pm }

For once I like to see “Claudia” on the list of names!!

6 Scott { 07.13.19 at 5:23 pm }

Need to name one Evangeline

7 Shondae Dickinson { 07.13.19 at 3:10 pm }

Please add Shondae to the list!!!

8 BarryWB { 07.13.19 at 12:54 pm }

I’m a hurricane…wonder if I’ll get retired

9 Veda Ajamu { 07.12.19 at 9:05 pm }

Please consider the name Veda (Pronounced Vee-dah).

10 Imelda Chavez { 07.12.19 at 8:53 pm }

Thanks for adding my name to the list!

11 Rhonda { 07.12.19 at 12:56 pm }

What?? No RHONDA???

12 Jessica Gayle { 07.12.19 at 12:52 pm }

How come they never named one Jessica. I think they need ro name one at least Jessica. I want back from the frist one on till now none was ever named Jessica

13 Tonya { 07.12.19 at 11:43 am }

Name one Tonya

14 Nimisha { 07.12.19 at 10:21 am }

Please add my name to the list.

15 Neal fogo { 07.11.19 at 7:18 pm }

Please name a hurricane after my childhood pet iguana’s friend juanita’s Next-door neighbor lupe tortilla. Thank you

16 Annette { 07.11.19 at 6:48 pm }

Can we please add Annette or John or Terri

17 Hannah Dougherty { 07.11.19 at 4:59 pm }

Add Hannah, Trinidee, and Marie!

18 Alayna { 07.11.19 at 8:59 am }

Please put my name for a hurricane my mom Alisha had her name as a hurricane Alicia so it be nice if I could have my name to also add my dads name Albert ( Andy) Anderson

19 Denise Whitfield { 07.10.19 at 11:04 pm }

Hi I would like to have my daughter name Brionna added to the hurricane list and my grand daughter Bri’ell name added to the hurricane name list

20 Sherry S { 07.09.19 at 7:23 pm }

Need to use the name SHERRY. It would be a lot of wind and rain but no damage!!c

21 Ashley { 07.04.19 at 3:29 pm }

Need to name 1 Ashley
An Elliott
And a Kennsley

22 Michael H { 07.02.19 at 7:12 pm }

my name got retired last year. feelsbadman

23 Emily Galloway { 06.28.19 at 12:14 pm }

I think we are so lucky to have the National Hurricane Center, your office does a fabulous job with an impossible situation. I fear that climate change is going to make your services even more needed, especially with the idiot Trump in the White House ignoring science.

24 Alan Foster would be a great first full name Hurricane! { 06.26.19 at 11:10 pm }

I think we should be able to pay for names and the money goes to charity!

25 Susan Higgins { 06.24.19 at 9:28 am }

Jody, the article explains how the World Meteorological Organization is responsible for developing the names for both Northern Pacific and Atlantic storms. So we just like to ask if you’re name is on it this year.

26 Jody Crawford { 06.23.19 at 10:17 pm }

How do you make the list?

27 Melissa Sims { 06.07.19 at 5:19 pm }

My name is on the list Melissa hope it doesn’t do much damage. Weird though I’m the 13 th storm this year and my dad passed away on the 13th of July 2009 and it’s 2019.

28 Henry Hogan { 06.03.19 at 9:42 pm }

You can keep your names. They’re ridiculous. There is hardly an normal name on the list. Barry and Erin, that’s about it.

29 Amina { 05.27.19 at 12:04 am }

Please help me to put my daughter name on list.

30 Fee { 05.22.19 at 12:34 am }

So, my mom had a friend when I was a kid. Her husband told his wife and my mom to come up with 5 list of names, and they had took beer alternating guys and gals names. If you look at one of the lists hermine is my mom’s name, Charlie was their dog, David was their son, Barry is my dad.

31 Chris { 05.21.19 at 12:47 am }

Jo, I think it means that there’s a six-year supply of names. The names for any given year will be identical to the ones used seven years prior. So 2019 and 2013 have the same names, 2020 will have the same names as 2014, etc.

The only time a list changes over this seven year cycle is if one of the storms does great damage and has its name retired.

32 Austin { 05.07.19 at 12:59 pm }

i can´t belive that the sebation one its driving me crazy

33 Susan Higgins { 05.21.19 at 9:19 am }

Hi Jo, we have tweaked the story for better clarification.

34 Jo Davis { 05.01.19 at 10:34 pm }

I don’t understand these two comments. One sentence says that there are new names every year, the next says that they are recycled every 6 years. Which is it? “Each year a new set of hurricane names is developed, and most years, 21 new ones are on tap and ready to be put to use. But every six years, the names cycle back around and get reused”

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