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The Truth Behind “In Like A Lion, Out Like a Lamb”

The Truth Behind “In Like A Lion, Out Like a Lamb”

You may be familiar with this bit of folklore about March:

If March comes in like a lion, it will go out like a lamb.

Is there any truth to this saying? Weather folklore sayings are as colorful as our imagination. While many sayings are based on careful observations and turn out to be accurate, others are merely rhymes or beliefs of the people who came before us.

Ancestral Beliefs—Balance

Those people often believed that bad spirits could affect the weather adversely, so they were cautious as to what they did or did not do in certain situations.

Those beliefs often included ideas that there should be a balance in weather and life. So, if a month came in bad (roaring like a lion), it should go out good and calm (docile, like a lamb).

With March being such a changeable month, in which we can see warm spring-like temperatures or late-season snowstorms, you can understand how this saying might hold true in some instances.

We can only hope that if March starts off stormy it will end on a calm note, but the key word is hope. However, this saying seems to be simply a rhyme rather than a true weather predictor.

Will weather get docile like a lamb? There is a that there should be a balance in weather and in life.

More March Weather Lore

  • Some other March-related weather lore includes:
  • A dry March and a wet May? Fill barns and bays with corn and hay.
  • As it rains in March, so it rains in June.
  • March winds and April showers? Bring forth May flowers.
  • So many mists in March you see, so many frosts in May will be.
  • Is’t on St. Joseph’s day (19th) clear,
    So follows a fertile year;
    Is’t on St. Mary’s (25th) bright and clear,
    Fertile is said to be the year.

What will March be like where you live?  Check the forecast for your zone here.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1919, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.

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